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Survival vocabulary lessons, currency conversion, and more.

Easy Turkish Travel Phrases on Flash Cards

    Want to learn enough easy Turkish travel phrases to get by, without all the extras? I got you.

    Here are the phrases I use most when traveling to shop, dine, and make friends — all on flashcards so you can study & quiz yourself! I’ve given the pronunciation that an American can easily learn well enough to be understood.

    Easy Turkish travel phrases to help you shop, dine, and make friends in Turkey.

    Easy Turkish Travel Phrases


    Please

    Lütfen

    Pronounced like loot-fen


    Thank you

    Teşekkür ederim

    Pronounced like tesh-eh-KUR-ed-air-em

    Yes

    Evet

    Pronounced evet

    No

    Hayir

    Pronounced similar to the word “higher” English, but with a tapped r

    One of those

    Useful when shopping or choosing items in a bakery

    Bunlardan biri

    Pronounced boon-lard-an beery

    How much?

    Ne kadar?

    Pronounced nay kah-dar (with a tapped r)

    Check, please

    Asking the waiter for the bill

    Hesap lütfen

    pronounced hey-sop loot-fen

    Chicken

    Tavuk

    pronounced tah-vook

    Coffee/Tea

    Learn both or pick your favorite

    Kahve/çay

    Pronounced ka-h-vay (try to say the H sound)/Chai

    Water

    Su

    Pronounced likek the name Sue. This word is also used for juices

    Hello

    Merhaba

    pronounced MARE-ha-bah

    OK (or Alright)

    Tamam

    Pronounced tah-MOM

    Where is the bathroom (toilet)?

    Tuvalet nerede?

    Pronounced too-va-LET Nair-e-DAY

    I don’t understand

    This phrase is incredibly useful. It can take the place of “I don’t speak Turkish” or “Do you speak English” or just “I don’t get it.”

    Anlamıyorum

    Pronounced AN-LAH-myor-um

    I hope these easy Turkish travel phrases will help you enjoy your visit to Turkey!

    If you’re ready for more, I suggest learning the names of popular Turkish foods, and the Turkish numbers 1-10.